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Transgender Day of Remembrance

Fast approaching is the somber and incredibly important day: The Transgender Day of Remembrance: November 20th. Some may ask why this day is so important to honor and respect, especially when many do not experience what being transgender is like or do not understand what transgendered means. Hell, my word-checking software on this computer does not recognize transgendered or transgendering…

http://www.mlp.org/2013/11/08/never-forget-faces-transgender-day-remembrance-2013/

So what is transgendered? Transgender is a hugely complex umbrella term which in many cases (but not all) the gender identity one is does not match the assigned sex they were born with. Some identify terms which fall under transgendered for some people include:

Female- Male Transgender

Male- Female Transgender

Gender- Queer

Intersex Individuals

Transsexual (however, this term is becoming more obsolete)

Bigender

Transvestite/ Cross-dresser (these are hugely contested terms, and it really depends on an individual persons choice to identify as this AND transgendered. Be leery of using these terms now a days.)

Drag Kings/ Drag Queens (Much like transvestite and cross-dressers, just because you perform in drag does not mean you are automatically trans. Drag Kings and Queens bend gender boundaries and sometimes identify as trans but not always and not always openly.)

AND MANY MORE

Yet that in itself does not express the complexity of transgender identity because one of the most problematic assumptions and aspects of cis-gendered society’s views of transgendered, is that it relies simply on biological difference and the medicalization of experience and genitalia. Essentially, the problematic reliance of mainstream society on if a trans individual is pre or post-op, takes away from the lived reality of trans identified individuals by melting away the person to simply being what their genitalia is or if it is recognizably male or female. I think a big part of this problem is that many people see transgender as meaning trans-itioning, as if they are in the process of being changed or even fixed. Just because some people identify as trans does not mean they still have sex-assignment surgery to do or they are still on hormone. Don’t medicalize their bodies and identifies for the sack of clarification. This hyper-focus on the genitalia of a transgendered identified person is in stark contrast to another huge problem trans identified people face: invisibility.

Invisibility within straight culture (or mainstream culture) but also within GLBT culture. The erasure of trans experience and voice is a big part of why November the 20th should be recognized and honored. The Transgender Day of Remembrance is to celebrate the lives of trans identified individuals who have been killed because of transphobia and to have a national conversation about the invisibility of these people and the marginalization and discrimination they face, simply because they exist.

There are many events happening around Ottawa to mourn and celebrate the lives of trans identified people, taken too soon. Below you will find a list and links.

Ottawa Trans Day of Remembrance- Celebrate, Educate, and Commemorate. HOSTED BY PTS

Novemember 18th- November 20th

https://www.facebook.com/events/176848085733100/

“There are few populations in Canada not recognized in Human Rights law and protected by Hate Crimes law. Few still experience the intolerance and violence that transsexual, transgender and gender-queer (trans) people do.

This year, Ottawa trans communities are organizing a weekend-long event to celebrate, educate and commemorate the lives of transsexual, transgender and gender-queer communities – providing an opportunity for people of all trans experiences and backgrounds to get involved and participate.

From November 18 to November 20, you have the opportunity to stand in solidarity with trans people as we raise awareness, encourage dialogue, celebrate our lives and remember our loved and lost ones. We encourage everyone interested in supporting the lives of ALL trans people to join us for this weekend of celebration, education and commemoration.

The weekend of events will include a flag raising, dance party and political meet and greet; and in tradition, the annual Ottawa Trans Day of Remembrance will be observed on November 20 with a vigil at the Human Rights Monument.”

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Schedule of events
Focus Event:
CANDLELIGHT VIGIL
Sunday, November 20, 2011, 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Human Right’s Monument (Elgin and Lisgar)
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Other Events:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011

11:00 am – Hotel de Ville Gatineau City Hall Flag Raising
(25 rue Laurier, Gatineau)
Informal Ceremony

1:00 pm – Ottawa City Hall Flag Raising Ceremony
Ottawa City Hall (110 Laurier Ave. W.)
Speakers to be confirmed

6:00 pm – Ottawa Police Services Flag Raising Ceremony
Ottawa Police Headquarters (474 Elgin St.)
Speakers to include: Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, Chief Vern White, Fire Chief John de Hooge, Paramedic Superintendent Paul Morneau and Trans Communuty Members Alex Thompson and Amanda Ryan.

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011

12:30 pm – Ottawa Paramedic Flag Raising Ceremony
Ottawa Paramedic Headquarters (2465 Don Reid Dr.)

2:00 – 4:00 pm – Political Meet and Greet
Ottawa City Hall Councillor’s Lounge
Speakers to include: MPP Yasir Naqvi, MP Randall Garrison, Paramedic Superintendents Paul Morneau and Deanna Schofield, Trans Community Member Jessica Freedman.

10:00 pm – 2:00 am – TDOR and Certain Sort present: The Real T Party!
A dance party to celebrate Ottawa Trans Day of Remembrance.
With CPI and DJ Y’alla! Y’alla!
The Royal Canadian Legion (330 Kent St.)
All ages (bring ID, all those over 19 with valid ID will get bracelets that will allow you to purchase alcohol).
$5 – $15 sliding scale
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=208895885850033&notif_t=event_invite

Accessibility Notes:
The front entrance, bathroom and bar/lounge area are all accessible to those using wheelchairs. The dance floor is down two medium steps.

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

7:00 pm – TDOR Candlelight Vigil
Human Right’s Monument (Elgin and Lisgar)
Speakers to Include Trans Community Member Alex Thomas and Volunteers who would like to speak about a friend or family member they have lost.

The vigil will include reading from a list of names of people who have died as a result of transphobic violence and/or suicide. If you would like a friend or loved one included in our list of names, please email transaction@ptsottawa.org with the details. We are also looking for speakers who would like to talk about how transphobic violence has affected their lives.

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For more information or for media inquiries please contact:

ottawa.trans.day.remembrance@gmail.com

Transgender Day of Remembrance- Non-Profit Organization

Novemeber 20th

https://www.facebook.com/transdayofremembrance/info?tab=page_info

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Feminist Futures Lecture Series at Carleton University!

The Pauline Jewett Institute for Women’s and Gender Studies is pleased to announce the inauguration of the Feminist Futures Lecture Series, which launches this 2014/15 academic year. The series offers presentations of current feminist research being carried out by faculty associated with the Institute. Drawing from the rich interdisciplinary, intersectional research environment that marks past work and frames future endeavours, the Feminist Futures Lecture Series continues the development of critical intellectual and political spaces and knowledge-building around gendered issues. In this friendly but critically engaged space, you are invited to connect with a community of scholar-activists.

Come and be part of the excellent scholarship, debates, and conversations emerging out of Women’s and Gender Studies at Carleton!

http://carleton.ca/womensstudies/feminist-futures/

Mondays, 3:30 – 5 PM

November 17, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

“’In the game and I must be a soldier’: Gender, Class, and World War I Canadian Military Nurse Annie Green.”  

Sandy Campbell

SandyCampbell_image

Abstract: Dr. Campbell’s paper examines the life and career of nurse Annie Green (1882-1929), a native of Eastern Ontario who trained as a nurse at Kingston General Hospital in the early years of the century. Green was a type of the new woman, and served as a military nurse in hospitals in England and Wales in the latter stages of World War I, experiencing not only the flood of battlefield casualties invalided to England but also the Kinmel Camp Riots by Canadian soldiers in Wales at the end of the war. Campbell will draw on the rich collection of letters, photos and souvenir albums held at Queen’s University Archives and elsewhere on campus which document Green’s career held at Queen’s University to analyse Green’s life (and death) in the light of autobiographical theory, medical history, art history, class, gender and historical moment.

Bio: Dr Sandra Campbell, who retired last July from PJIWGS, is the author of Both Hands: A Life of Lorne Pierce of Ryerson Press, which was shortlisted for the Creighton Prize (2013) and co-author of a forthcoming collection of essays on Bermuda history entitled Short Bermudas. She has taught at Carleton, McGill, University of Ottawa and Bermuda College and serves as general editor of the Tecumseh Press series, Canada’s Early Canadian Women Writers. She is co-editor of three collections of short fiction by Canadian women covering the period 1800-1920.

NOTE: Photo credit: Queen’s University Archives.

January 12, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

“Sluts Who Deserve Nothing: Unwed Motherhood, Social Stigma, and Social-Cultural Change”

Karen March

KarenMarch_image

Abstract: Using data gathered from semi-structured interviews with 33 reunited birth mothers, I describe how stereotypical images of female sexuality contributed to the women’s sense of shame over their unwed pregnancy and reinforced their decision to hide their birth mother status from others. By contrast, acceptance of contact from their placed child when he/she reached adulthood and public revelation of self as a birth mother was supported by their recognition of socio-cultural changes in the position of women since the adoption had occurred.

Bio: Karen March is an associate professor in the department of sociology and anthropology at Carleton University. She teaches courses on family, aging and qualitative research methods at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She uses in-depth interviewing, participant observation and focus group methodologies in her own research, participates actively in the Canadian Qualitative Analysis Conference and has been on the executive board of the Canadian Sociology Association. As part of her administrative duties at Carleton, she has held the positions of Associate Dean of Student Affairs for the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Carleton, Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Carleton University, and Interim Associate Dean of Student Affairs for the Faculty of Graduate and Studies.

Dr. March has been working in the field of adoption research for over fifteen years and concentrates on issues of identity. Her book The Stranger Who Bore Me examines the search motivations of adopted adults and their perception of contact outcome. She conducted a Canadian-wide study of community attitudes toward adoption with Dr. Charlene Miall of McMaster University which resulted in publications in journals such as Adoption Quarterly, Journal of Family Relations and the Canadian Review of Sociology.

February 9, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

“Brilliant Freak and Foreigner in Russia: The Life and Art of Marie-Anne Collot”

Debra Graham

DebraGraham_image

Abstract: Marie-Anne Collot (French, 1748-1821) is one of the least known portrait sculptors in the history of Western art, even while her achievements rival the most seminal figures of the genre. Of humble origins and deprived of her family at an early age, Collot began to earn her living as an artist’s model in Paris, entering the studio of Etienne-Maurice Falconet at the age of fifteen. There she quickly learned to sculpt, earning the admiration and patronage of such connoisseurs as Denis Diderot and the Russian Prince Dmitry Golitsyn. She accompanied Falconet to St. Petersburg in 1766 when he was commissioned by Catherine the Great to create a monument to Peter the Great, now known as the Bronze Horseman. Yet the proud leader’s head crowned with a laurel wreath was not the work of the famed French artist but rather that of the twenty-four year old Collot. Collot, a young woman uniquely working in a “masculine” art, enjoyed a meteoric rise to success during her years in Russia: at the age of eighteen, she was inducted into the Imperial Academy of Arts and she established an impressive clientele including St. Petersburg’s nobility, French intellectual elites, and even Catherine the Great herself. This presentation investigates 1) how Collot navigated the gendered dimensions of eighteenth-century life; 2) the innovative aesthetic qualities of her work; and 3) why she remains invisible in current scholarship.

Bio: Debra Graham earned her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Missouri-Columbia and is an assistant professor in the department of Women’s and Gender Studies. She teaches courses on feminist theory and cultural production. Her expertise and research program are focused in the areas of identity, power, and representation as applied to portraiture, popular culture, new-media communities and cultural citizenship. Her current research project involves a comprehensive study of the life and work of eighteenth-century sculptor Marie-Anne Collot.

Image Credit Line: Marie-Anne Collot (French, 1748-1821), Portrait of Catherine the Great, 1769, marble, height 24 “ (61 cm), State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

March 9, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

Title TBA

Florence Bird Lecture: Karyn Recollet

Transformative Justice Week is coming up at Carleton!

Transformative Justice Week is coming up at Carleton!

https://www.facebook.com/events/274624556067116/?ref=4

Transformative Justice Week at Carleton exists to support trans folks who are struggling, educate students about trans issues, celebrate trans folks in our community, and commemorate Trans Day of Remembrance.

(TW: violence and murder)

The Trans Day of Remembrance was set aside to memorialize those who were killed due to transmisogynistic hatred or prejudice. The event is held in November to honor Rita Hester, whose murder on November 28th, 1998 kicked off the “Remembering Our Dead” web project and a San Francisco candlelight vigil in 1999. Rita Hester’s murder — like most transfeminine murder cases — has yet to be solved. For more information, please seehttp://www.gender.org/remember/

November 18th:
-Button-making (all-day)
-Trans 101 workshop (5PM)

November 19th:
-Trans Sexualities workshop (and screening) by Tobi Hill-Meyer (6 PM)

Come to talk about bodies, language, behaviors, and desires (and coming!) – all presented with trans, genderqueer, and gender non-conforming people in mind. Our communities have particular concerns as well as special opportunities for fun and frolic, that are often left out of mainstream Sex Ed. We’ll talk about what can be adapted for our bodies and how to do it. Here’s a chance to learn about the care, feeding, and delight of your tingly bits (and/or those of your partner) in a safe and trans-positive environment.

PLUS A BONUS FILM SCREENING! This film that takes a critical look at the trans porn industry through a trans woman’s first and only two mainstream porn shoots.(https://www.facebook.com/events/1558373514395749/?notif_t=plan_user_joined)

November 20th:
-Fighting Transmisogyny Workshop by Tobi-Hill-Meyer (5PM)

Have you ever noticed that trans women tend not to come to an event you help run? Or that the posters never have trans women on them? Did you just make a book or a film only to realize it includes a bunch of trans men but little or no trans women? Did you know there’s a joke that women & trans spaces should be called women *or* trans, but not both? There are a lot of spaces within a certain segment of queer/trans community that is pretty good at having trans men and trans masculine folks represented but not trans women or trans female/feminine spectrum people. Lets get together to discuss the how and why of this dynamic and what we can do to turn things around. (https://www.facebook.com/events/1558373514395749/?notif_t=plan_user_joined)

–Positive Possibilities: a Transfeminine-Spectrum Panel
(6:30 PM)

In honour of Transformative Justice Week, we are hosting five individuals who will come together to speak about their lives, their dreams, and their experiences as transfeminine-spectrum people. By listening to people in our local communities, we gain access to a variety of positive possibility models. Members of the Ottawa community, please join us to listen to these amazing individuals and to support transfeminine story-sharing! (https://www.facebook.com/events/718943411509141/718943414842474/?notif_t=like)

November 21st:
-Debrief crafting (all-day)
-Transfeminine support group facilitated by Mel Pelley (5PM)

#takedownjulienblanc

Recently self-proclaimed master pickup artist Julien Blanc has come under fire for his “educational” seminars teaching men to control, humiliate and be persistent (as he puts it) when trying to hook up with women. In these seminars which can cost up to $3000 per ticket, Blanc has been recorded telling men that no doesn’t mean no but is a weak excuse that is “irrelevant”. Furthermore, there is now video surfacing of Blanc’s seminars in Japan where he tells white men that they can get away with anything in regards to Japanese women, just yell: Pikachu, including taking women’s heads and forcing them down to his junk. His world tour to spread his “game” has had some hiccups due to the hash-tag campaign: #takedownjulienblanc. This activist campaign resulted in Australia revoking his visa and asking him to leave. Currently there is another leg of this campaign happening as his next reported stops along his tour is to the UK and Canada. #keepjulienblancoutofcanada is vastly growing.

What do I think about this? He’s a scumbag that knows how to work women’s insecurities and relies on intimidation to not only get himself laid but to try to get other guys laid too. What bothers me most about Julien Blanc is the physical assault he is doing and worse of all, encouraging. It is not okay to force a woman’s head down to your crotch nor is it okay to hold a woman by the neck. These are things that Blanc has been recorded doing in an effort to “pull” women home with him. While I am extremely happy that his misogyny and racist remarks are being addressed, I can’t help but to wonder why he is not being charged with a crime? He is blatantly advocating sexual harassment and possibly assault. It is not a far reach to say that he is spreading hate speech and ways to enact it against women. Yet ultimately, Blanc is not the root cause of sexism or racism but is instead an example of it. While sexism and racism are such huge and highly complicated issues which are not easily defeated, let alone recognized, we can stand up against them by standing up against assholes like Blanc who knowingly use patriarchy and white privilege to take advantage over women and teach other men how to do it too.

See the link here: