Carleton University

Interview with Professor Ummni Khan on Vicarious Kink

Recorded Sept 22nd, 2014. On this episode of Femme Fatale Professor Ummni Khan from Carleton University joined Lilith to talk about her research on various alternative or “inappropriate” sexualities in today’s society. With a diverse set of research interests, Professor Khan looks at the intersectional nature of sexuality, gender and the racialized body. In her newest book Vicarious Kinks, Professor Khan explores the construction of sadomasochism by film, law, science and feminism.

CKCU 93.1 FM

Listen Here

Lara Karaian Interview on Selfies, Sexuality and Teens: A Canadian Perspective

Recorded December 1st, 2014. On this episode of Femme Fatale, Lilith brought assistant professor in the Carleton Criminology department professor Lara Karian to talk about her research. Looking at the regulation of sexuality in Canada through law and the culture of porn informed her current work on how teen sexuality is regarded both socially and through the law here in Canada, and how teens themselves see sex and sex education.

CKCU 93.1 FM

Listen Here

Pop Culture Roundup Show!

Recorded November 17th, 2014. On Today’s show, Lilith took the opportunity to chat in depth about what has been going on in Pop culture and News today. With a look at the real issue behind the Kim Kardashian photo shoot, and the KKK’s rebranding, there is a lot to talk about. And in honor of Carleton University’s various SEXWEEKS on campus, Lilith also spoke about what is happening in Turkey with textbooks discussing genitalia! A packed show for sure!

CKCU 93.1 FM

Click Here to Listen!

Feminist Futures Lecture Series at Carleton University!

The Pauline Jewett Institute for Women’s and Gender Studies is pleased to announce the inauguration of the Feminist Futures Lecture Series, which launches this 2014/15 academic year. The series offers presentations of current feminist research being carried out by faculty associated with the Institute. Drawing from the rich interdisciplinary, intersectional research environment that marks past work and frames future endeavours, the Feminist Futures Lecture Series continues the development of critical intellectual and political spaces and knowledge-building around gendered issues. In this friendly but critically engaged space, you are invited to connect with a community of scholar-activists.

Come and be part of the excellent scholarship, debates, and conversations emerging out of Women’s and Gender Studies at Carleton!

http://carleton.ca/womensstudies/feminist-futures/

Mondays, 3:30 – 5 PM

November 17, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

“’In the game and I must be a soldier’: Gender, Class, and World War I Canadian Military Nurse Annie Green.”  

Sandy Campbell

SandyCampbell_image

Abstract: Dr. Campbell’s paper examines the life and career of nurse Annie Green (1882-1929), a native of Eastern Ontario who trained as a nurse at Kingston General Hospital in the early years of the century. Green was a type of the new woman, and served as a military nurse in hospitals in England and Wales in the latter stages of World War I, experiencing not only the flood of battlefield casualties invalided to England but also the Kinmel Camp Riots by Canadian soldiers in Wales at the end of the war. Campbell will draw on the rich collection of letters, photos and souvenir albums held at Queen’s University Archives and elsewhere on campus which document Green’s career held at Queen’s University to analyse Green’s life (and death) in the light of autobiographical theory, medical history, art history, class, gender and historical moment.

Bio: Dr Sandra Campbell, who retired last July from PJIWGS, is the author of Both Hands: A Life of Lorne Pierce of Ryerson Press, which was shortlisted for the Creighton Prize (2013) and co-author of a forthcoming collection of essays on Bermuda history entitled Short Bermudas. She has taught at Carleton, McGill, University of Ottawa and Bermuda College and serves as general editor of the Tecumseh Press series, Canada’s Early Canadian Women Writers. She is co-editor of three collections of short fiction by Canadian women covering the period 1800-1920.

NOTE: Photo credit: Queen’s University Archives.

January 12, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

“Sluts Who Deserve Nothing: Unwed Motherhood, Social Stigma, and Social-Cultural Change”

Karen March

KarenMarch_image

Abstract: Using data gathered from semi-structured interviews with 33 reunited birth mothers, I describe how stereotypical images of female sexuality contributed to the women’s sense of shame over their unwed pregnancy and reinforced their decision to hide their birth mother status from others. By contrast, acceptance of contact from their placed child when he/she reached adulthood and public revelation of self as a birth mother was supported by their recognition of socio-cultural changes in the position of women since the adoption had occurred.

Bio: Karen March is an associate professor in the department of sociology and anthropology at Carleton University. She teaches courses on family, aging and qualitative research methods at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She uses in-depth interviewing, participant observation and focus group methodologies in her own research, participates actively in the Canadian Qualitative Analysis Conference and has been on the executive board of the Canadian Sociology Association. As part of her administrative duties at Carleton, she has held the positions of Associate Dean of Student Affairs for the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Carleton, Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Carleton University, and Interim Associate Dean of Student Affairs for the Faculty of Graduate and Studies.

Dr. March has been working in the field of adoption research for over fifteen years and concentrates on issues of identity. Her book The Stranger Who Bore Me examines the search motivations of adopted adults and their perception of contact outcome. She conducted a Canadian-wide study of community attitudes toward adoption with Dr. Charlene Miall of McMaster University which resulted in publications in journals such as Adoption Quarterly, Journal of Family Relations and the Canadian Review of Sociology.

February 9, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

“Brilliant Freak and Foreigner in Russia: The Life and Art of Marie-Anne Collot”

Debra Graham

DebraGraham_image

Abstract: Marie-Anne Collot (French, 1748-1821) is one of the least known portrait sculptors in the history of Western art, even while her achievements rival the most seminal figures of the genre. Of humble origins and deprived of her family at an early age, Collot began to earn her living as an artist’s model in Paris, entering the studio of Etienne-Maurice Falconet at the age of fifteen. There she quickly learned to sculpt, earning the admiration and patronage of such connoisseurs as Denis Diderot and the Russian Prince Dmitry Golitsyn. She accompanied Falconet to St. Petersburg in 1766 when he was commissioned by Catherine the Great to create a monument to Peter the Great, now known as the Bronze Horseman. Yet the proud leader’s head crowned with a laurel wreath was not the work of the famed French artist but rather that of the twenty-four year old Collot. Collot, a young woman uniquely working in a “masculine” art, enjoyed a meteoric rise to success during her years in Russia: at the age of eighteen, she was inducted into the Imperial Academy of Arts and she established an impressive clientele including St. Petersburg’s nobility, French intellectual elites, and even Catherine the Great herself. This presentation investigates 1) how Collot navigated the gendered dimensions of eighteenth-century life; 2) the innovative aesthetic qualities of her work; and 3) why she remains invisible in current scholarship.

Bio: Debra Graham earned her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Missouri-Columbia and is an assistant professor in the department of Women’s and Gender Studies. She teaches courses on feminist theory and cultural production. Her expertise and research program are focused in the areas of identity, power, and representation as applied to portraiture, popular culture, new-media communities and cultural citizenship. Her current research project involves a comprehensive study of the life and work of eighteenth-century sculptor Marie-Anne Collot.

Image Credit Line: Marie-Anne Collot (French, 1748-1821), Portrait of Catherine the Great, 1769, marble, height 24 “ (61 cm), State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

March 9, 3:30 – 5:00 PM. DT 2017

Title TBA

Florence Bird Lecture: Karyn Recollet

Transformative Justice Week is coming up at Carleton!

Transformative Justice Week is coming up at Carleton!

https://www.facebook.com/events/274624556067116/?ref=4

Transformative Justice Week at Carleton exists to support trans folks who are struggling, educate students about trans issues, celebrate trans folks in our community, and commemorate Trans Day of Remembrance.

(TW: violence and murder)

The Trans Day of Remembrance was set aside to memorialize those who were killed due to transmisogynistic hatred or prejudice. The event is held in November to honor Rita Hester, whose murder on November 28th, 1998 kicked off the “Remembering Our Dead” web project and a San Francisco candlelight vigil in 1999. Rita Hester’s murder — like most transfeminine murder cases — has yet to be solved. For more information, please seehttp://www.gender.org/remember/

November 18th:
-Button-making (all-day)
-Trans 101 workshop (5PM)

November 19th:
-Trans Sexualities workshop (and screening) by Tobi Hill-Meyer (6 PM)

Come to talk about bodies, language, behaviors, and desires (and coming!) – all presented with trans, genderqueer, and gender non-conforming people in mind. Our communities have particular concerns as well as special opportunities for fun and frolic, that are often left out of mainstream Sex Ed. We’ll talk about what can be adapted for our bodies and how to do it. Here’s a chance to learn about the care, feeding, and delight of your tingly bits (and/or those of your partner) in a safe and trans-positive environment.

PLUS A BONUS FILM SCREENING! This film that takes a critical look at the trans porn industry through a trans woman’s first and only two mainstream porn shoots.(https://www.facebook.com/events/1558373514395749/?notif_t=plan_user_joined)

November 20th:
-Fighting Transmisogyny Workshop by Tobi-Hill-Meyer (5PM)

Have you ever noticed that trans women tend not to come to an event you help run? Or that the posters never have trans women on them? Did you just make a book or a film only to realize it includes a bunch of trans men but little or no trans women? Did you know there’s a joke that women & trans spaces should be called women *or* trans, but not both? There are a lot of spaces within a certain segment of queer/trans community that is pretty good at having trans men and trans masculine folks represented but not trans women or trans female/feminine spectrum people. Lets get together to discuss the how and why of this dynamic and what we can do to turn things around. (https://www.facebook.com/events/1558373514395749/?notif_t=plan_user_joined)

–Positive Possibilities: a Transfeminine-Spectrum Panel
(6:30 PM)

In honour of Transformative Justice Week, we are hosting five individuals who will come together to speak about their lives, their dreams, and their experiences as transfeminine-spectrum people. By listening to people in our local communities, we gain access to a variety of positive possibility models. Members of the Ottawa community, please join us to listen to these amazing individuals and to support transfeminine story-sharing! (https://www.facebook.com/events/718943411509141/718943414842474/?notif_t=like)

November 21st:
-Debrief crafting (all-day)
-Transfeminine support group facilitated by Mel Pelley (5PM)